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Brian Floyd
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 07 July 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 6897
Posted: 17 May 2020 at 4:38pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Robocop is the first Rated R movie I ever saw in a theater. I was 16, and my father took me.
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Shaun Barry
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 08 December 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 6431
Posted: 19 May 2020 at 2:20pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply


50th Anniversary Sequel Alert:

BENEATH THE PLANET OF THE APES (1970)

If the original had fantastic elements that were presented in as grounded or believable a way as possible, then this follow-up delves right into pure fantasy within the first 15 min.

Fun for what it is, but jarring if you watch it back-to-back with Part 1.  And it certainly gets my vote for one of the most depressing endings I ever saw, back when I caught this during a POTA marathon on cable, in the mid-'80s!



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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 119895
Posted: 19 May 2020 at 6:31pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

BtPotA sets the pattern for all the erase-the-original-to-make-a-sequel sequels that followed. Right from the first new footage!
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 119895
Posted: 23 May 2020 at 4:14am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN (2019)

Argh!! I thought it was a racing movie. Instead, itís another dead dog. %#$& thing totally wrecked me!!

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Shaun Barry
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 08 December 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 6431
Posted: 23 May 2020 at 7:42am | IP Logged | 5 post reply


THE APARTMENT (1960)

My eldest daughter absolutely adores SOME LIKE IT HOT, so I figured I was due to show her Billy Wilder and Jack Lemmon's next collaboration (plus, it hits 60 years next month)... 

Good performances and excellent black & white widescreen photography, but not really the madcap comedy one would have expected at the time.  More of a straight drama with light moments, and understandably a bit dark & heavy when dealing with issues of suicide.

Ultimately a pleasant watch, with a couple chuckles, but not quite as enjoyable as I was hoping.  But my daughter was glad we watched it, she loves Jack Lemmon!





Edited by Shaun Barry on 23 May 2020 at 7:55am
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Tim O Neill
Byrne Robotics Security


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 10227
Posted: 23 May 2020 at 2:14pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply



The top spot for my favorite film fluctuates, but THE APARTMENT is probably
the reigning champ. The first hour is Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond's best comedy
work - not as broad as SOME LIKE IT HOT, but it's like poetry to me. Most
movies who set up a comedic premise like this take it all the way to the end,
sustaining the comedy and tone. But the exciting thing about THE
APARTMENT is it takes its characters seriously and gives them a much more
dramatic second half. It's half brilliant comedy, half keen insight into how the
corporate machine encourages some of the worst behavior. The film's perfect
balance is extraordinary.

I think most people agree with you, Shaun - SOME LIKE IT HOT is the one
everyone knows and loves. But THE APARTMENT is my near and dear in my
book!


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Joe S. Walker
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 576
Posted: 25 May 2020 at 5:47am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

FUNERAL PARADE OF ROSES (1969)

Japanese surrealist melodrama featuring transvestite prostitutes in Tokyo, with real-life "geibois" in the cast. A curious piece of work, not entirely successful but worth seeing.
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Robert Kowalewski II
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 4038
Posted: 25 May 2020 at 1:49pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

Curse of the Werewolf(Scream Factory Collectors Edition): Oliver Reed as the werewolf in Hammers' version of the werewolf legend, a different setting but a fun movie.
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 119895
Posted: 25 May 2020 at 2:02pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

Yes, I have a fondness for that one.
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 119895
Posted: 25 May 2020 at 6:57pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Had a couple of Hammer nights. PHANTOM OF THE OPERA last night, CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF and BRIDES OF DRACULA tonight.

The best word to describe these films is lush. Overlit, to be sure, but with deeply saturated color, magnificent set designs, beautiful costumes and period detail, and, yes those Hammer ladies with their deep cleavage rivaling the Marianas Trench.

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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 119895
Posted: 26 May 2020 at 4:52pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

MEN IN BLACK III (2012)

Continuity? What continuity?

Still, fun. This is about the fourth time, I think.

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Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 12562
Posted: 26 May 2020 at 5:56pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Got through a bunch over the last week.

Fletch (1985): one of Chevy Chase's stronger vehicles (there isn't too much competition, he says sniffily) and it's a bit of a weird stew, though somehow it all hangs together for the most part. Has a decent plot, some daffy humour, some witty humour, a very 80s score, and an attractive streak of anti-authoritarianism.

Rocky (1976): for my money, the best of the Rocky films (there isn't too much competition, he says sniffily). Love its sense of place, the richness and variety of its characters, though it is slightly odd to have such an inarticulate protagonist alongside a painfully shy leading lady and an equally inarticulate best friend. Really the only characters who speak with any kind of eloquence are Micky, Apollo and (very briefly) Gazzo, the 'two-bit loan shark'. Bill Conti's score is always worthy of praise, so a shout out for that.

Dune (1984). I have a strange soft spot for this -- I actually quite like it -- though its flaw run deep, deep, deep. Kyle MachLachlan was only 24 at the time of shooting, yet is significantly too old for the role of Paul Atreides. The film is insanely rushed after a certain point (basically everything after Paul and Jessica join the Fremen). Some of the FX shots are fine (even good), but some are terrible, given the monstrous budget. It is deliriously weird in places (at one point, the Harknonnens give a dog to Hawat that he has to milk daily. Yes, this broadly matches a plot point from the novel, but it is so bizarre). There are some totally unnecessary changes (such as the weirding modules), but the film does have a kind of poetry (try whispering spice) and it looks truly beautfiul in places (and is intentionally hideously ugly in many other places).

Being John Malkovich (1999). One of the most insanely inventive movies I can think of. I'd actually forgotten a tonne of this film's plot (really, everything after the Malkovich, Malkovich. Malkovich? Malkovich... Malkovich! scene). It is a joy how it manages to weave in new, unexpected development after new, unexpected development and enhance the story with each one. Took me 21 years to watch it a second time, but I think it's brilliant. Maybe I'll revisit it in 2041 [to celebrate 10-years of beating coronavirus :) ].




Edited by Peter Martin on 26 May 2020 at 5:57pm
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