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Topic: What disc did you have in last (and what did you think)? Post Reply | Post New Topic
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James Woodcock
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 21 September 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 5098
Posted: 11 October 2019 at 9:16pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Matt, in the U.K. we had a AA certificate which allowed 14 year old in. That then got raised to a 15 when the ratings were changed.

So some of those films that were an A (the US equivalent would be a PG) should really have been a AA.

Once the 15 came in, BATMAN (1989) necessitated the creation of the 12 as parents kept complaining that their kids couldn’t see the film.

& then Spider-Man necessitated that being modified to a 12A as parents kept turning up with kids clearly not 12 but whose twelfth birthday was miraculously the same day they were wanting to see Spider-Man.

Comic based films eh? Screwing up cinema ratings since 1989
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Petter Myhr Ness
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 02 July 2009
Location: Norway
Posts: 3065
Posted: 13 October 2019 at 3:07am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

SILENCE OF THE LAMBS (1991)

Watching this again, after so many years, I have to say it's a near pitch-perfect thriller that has aged remarkably well. Anthony Hopkins is truly chilling as Hannibal Lecter.

A shame about those sequels...

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Robert Kowalewski II
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 4029
Posted: 14 October 2019 at 7:40pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Lifeforce(1985) - Man, it's been forever since I saw this, I put in the UK Version just to see what 5 minutes were cut.  The Practical effects are decent for a movie about Space Vampires...
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Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 11981
Posted: 15 October 2019 at 9:34am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Henry V (1944). This film is a real accomplishment. The technicolour is a little too rich for my blood though -- it does work well with the wonderful costumes, but when the film eventually switches from the faux backdrops of the stage to actual location shooting, the green fields still have that sense of unreality which I feel works counter to what Olivier was trying for in gradually making the film more and more realistic as the audience 'makes imaginary puissance'. Similarly, not a fan of the painted backdrops throughout, which may just be a case of me watching with a modern eye (spoilt by the outrageously good matte painting work we got in the 70s and 80s).

Olivier himself is magnetic and commanding in the lead -- and also very inventive. For example, the clearing of his throat backstage at the beginning of the film, and the nuances he introduces in the wooing of Catherine de Valois at the end (I haven't done a side-by-side comparison, but just going off memory, I feel that Branagh borrowed some of these little bits and pieces for his performance in his 1989 version).

It's a remarkable contrast between the sheer volume Olivier is able to generate when commanding his troops in the field to his soft ruminations the night before the battle at Agincourt. He was also quite the horseman! Leaping in armour on to the back of a horse, is not an easy feat. There's also a scene where his horse prances a bit and you seem him instinctively lean over to lay a hand on the horse's shoulder, while not missing a beat in delivering his lines.

In his role as director, his decision to have the camera pan out for the big speeches worked really well, I think. Especially in the famous speech at Harfleur, it gives a dimension of verisimilitude as more and more details enter the frame -- and 70-odd years on it feels fresh, as films generally do not follow this style.

Renee Asherson is a delight as Catherine, and interesting to see Robert Helpmann's distinctive features in the role of the Bishop of Ely. I'm not a fan of the characters of Nym and Pistol and Bardolph, but that's not the film's fault. Nym barely features here, but Robert Newton's Pistol just feels awkwardly juxtaposed with the rest of the proceedings. Esmond Knight is pretty good as Fluellen, though his Welsh accent was more than a little lacking.

Overall, a landmark in how to make a film version of a Shakespeare play.


Edited by Peter Martin on 15 October 2019 at 9:35am
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Robert Kowalewski II
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 4029
Posted: 15 October 2019 at 7:45pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

Dracula: Prince of Darkness: the second outing of Lee as Dracula by Hammer, the new Blu transfer is nice...

Abbott & Costello meet Frankenstein(1948): Gotta get some comedy in there somehow, and Lugosi as Dracula and Chaney Jr. as Wolfman is always nice...
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 117291
Posted: 16 October 2019 at 9:11am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

MANHATTAN MELODRAMA (1934)

Notorious as the last movie seen by John Dillinger before he was gunned down outside the Biograph theater in Chicago.

Pretty standard “childhood friends take different paths” gangster story. William Powell and Myrna Loy not being Nick and Nora Charles.

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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 117291
Posted: 16 October 2019 at 4:36pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Surfed into DIRTY HARRY (1971). Hard to look away. I think this has held up as well as it has over the years because Harry is never wrong. No innocents get in the way of his vengeance trail.
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