Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login
Dr. Who MOBILE
Byrne Robotics | Dr. Who << Prev Page of 9 Next >>
Topic: Capaldi’s Final Series Post Reply | Post New Topic
Author
Message
James Woodcock
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 21 September 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 3912
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 4:53pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

All this talk of problems with Bill's accent reminds me of an occurrence on a holiday I had in Rome. We visited the catacombs where you can have a guide in you native language. We chose the English guide naturally.

The guide was Indian and started to speak. The Americans in our party asked what they had said. My wife and I explained what had been said and were asked how we knew. 'He spoke English' we replied. For the rest of the tour, we had to repeat everything the guide had said for the Americans, who could not believe we understood what was being said.

Bill is not hard to understand. What you guys would make of my accent (Yorkshire filtered through 30 years of Black Country) or Bill Collins accent (I assume you speak Black Country Bill) I dread to think. Mind you, another funny accent story comes to mind. About 20 years ago, back when my Yorkshire accent was still very strong, we started a children's club in Wednesbury, one of the places that likes to add extra vowels to words. I spoke more like Chorlton from Chorlton and the Wheelies (ello , littel ol' lady). We started the first session with me getting up and saying 'ello' to the kids.

Cue 50 kids replying in a Black Country accent 'Ello', totally mystified as to what the had just heard.

On a totally different topic, I'm quite liking this series, while I gave up on the last one. Bill, is not the annoying know it all I feared based on the previous Dalek scene.
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
James Woodcock
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 21 September 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 3912
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 4:55pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

Oh yeah, one final thing. I'm shocked at the whole 'university people would speak posh'. Really? Come on, you can't really believe that. Surely.
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Neil Lindholm
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 January 2005
Location: Macau
Posts: 4129
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 6:10pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Good thing I'm Canadian and have no accent whatsoever. :)
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Byron Graham
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 19 September 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 722
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 6:39pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Take off, yah hoser!
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Neil Lindholm
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 January 2005
Location: Macau
Posts: 4129
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 7:07pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

Don't know what you're talking aboot. 
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 106740
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 8:11pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

A few years back I watched a TV documentary about the Earth's various Ice Ages, and they touched upon all those huge rocks that were picked up by the ice and transported far from their points of origin.

In the process, they interviewed two Canadian professors of geology -- who sounded like Doug and Bob McKenzie.

So, no, a university education does not guarantee a posh accent.

Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 106740
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 8:13pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Don't know what you're talking aboot.

•••

For shame, Neil! You know it's closer to "aboat"!

Back to Top profile | search
 
Neil Lindholm
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 January 2005
Location: Macau
Posts: 4129
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 8:32pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

I was told the reasons Americans think that we say "aboot" (or "aboat") is that they say "abut" so the normal pronunciation sounds weird to them. Same as with "roof". Since Americans say "ruf", "roof" sounds strange. 

I have heard "ubut" and "ruf" many times so there might something to that. 
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Bill Collins
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 26 May 2005
Location: England
Posts: 8584
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 10:58pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

Yes James,i talk like Judas Priest`s Rob Halford
filtered through Jeff Lynne of ELO! We had a student
teacher from down that there London when we were at
junior school.he was mystified by us saying `Weem
goooin `um` (We`re going home`)
I currently work in Cannock a mere 7 miles from
home,but only me and one other speak with a Black
Country accent! James,have you seen Doreen
Tipton,she`s a comedy Black Country character played
by actress Gill Jordan? Very funny! Her movie even
features Robert Plant of Led Zep,Steve Bull the ex-
West Brom and Wolves footballer and local news icon
Nick Owen!
Anyway,back to Doctor Who...
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
James Woodcock
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 21 September 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 3912
Posted: 22 April 2017 at 11:37pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Ah yes, Doreen Tipton.

The song for our kids club went 'We're in the team and we call it stream'.

It became 'Weem in the te-am and we call it stree-am'. Very funny as a non-local to listen to.

I also got into a bit of bother over local dialect after hearing one boy call another a wench. I was there, shocked and explaining to the child you just don't call a girl that when an older, female, helper came over and asked what the fuss was about. I'm there explaining that the child had just called the little girl a wench and getting a blank face from the helper. 'What's the problem' she asks. 
'That's calling someone a prostitute' says I.

'Really?' Says the lady? 'Not rowand he-ar it's not' says she.

Ah, local variations


Edited by James Woodcock on 22 April 2017 at 11:44pm
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Brian Floyd
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 07 July 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 5231
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 12:25am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

The only times I've ever had problems understanding someone speaking English were when calling tech support for various things and occasionally ending up with someone in India who had an accent so thick that they might as well have been speaking Greek. 

Unless listening to Bob Dylan perform on live tv counts. He once performed `Like  A Rolling Stone', and mumbled the entire song. I didn't understand a single word.

`About' and `roof' are pronounced differently around the country, I guess. I've never heard anyone say them as if they sound like `abut' or `ruf'. (I say them as if they rhyme with `out' and `hoof'. And `hoof' doesn't sound like `huff'.)


Back to Top profile | search | email
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 106740
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 4:55am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Having spent my first eight years in England, followed by 20+ in Canada, followed by almost 40 in different parts of the US, I have been constantly aware of accents and pronunciation. It fits alongside a fascination with English pronunciation that began when I was a kid in school, and our teacher, introducing us to Elizabethan poetry, taught us that the writers used "visual rhymes", Thus, Come live with me and be my love / And we shall all the pleasures prove… was not meant to be read as if "live" and "prove" actually rhymed. They just LOOKED the same.

But I remembered my mother's father, who had what's called a "Potteries" accent, and DID pronounce "love" to rhyme with "prove", as well as "book" and "look" to rhyme with "fluke", and "bus" to nearly rhyme with "booze".

As an adult, fascinated by Elizabethan and Jacobean England, I learned more, and discovered that the pronunciations really were different back then. Much subtle and not so subtle meaning has been lost by the changes in the way we say words. For example, in Shakespeare's day it was common to pronounce the larger increments on a clock as "hore"...

Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 106740
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 4:57am | IP Logged | 13 post reply

I was told the reasons Americans think that we say "aboot"…

••

During my early days on line, one troll outed himself by insisting on spelling "about" as "aboot" because he claimed he was Canadian.

Back to Top profile | search
 
Neil Lindholm
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 January 2005
Location: Macau
Posts: 4129
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 5:28am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

That's funny. Like me spelling "ruff" to claim I was American or saying I was from "Norrich" to fake being a Brit. 
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Michael Roberts
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 20 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 10937
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 8:24am | IP Logged | 15 post reply

I was told the reasons Americans think that we say "aboot" (or "aboat")
is that they say "abut" so the normal pronunciation sounds weird to
them. Same as with "roof". Since Americans say "ruf", "roof" sounds
strange.

-----

I have never heard "abut" or "ruf". I'm sure there's some regional
pronunciation that sounds like that, but I would not generalize that as
an American pronunciation.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Brian O'Neill
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 13 November 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 1229
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 10:13am | IP Logged | 16 post reply

I don't think the spelling 'ruff' is meant to indicate a rhyme with 'rough' or 'bluff'. I have heard plenty of  people pronounce the double vowel in 'roof' as if if it  were the 'u' in 'put',  but I've never heard 'about' pronounced 'abut'.
Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 106740
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 10:24am | IP Logged | 17 post reply

Americans, in my experience, mostly pronounce "about" as "abowt", with the "ow" pronounced like the noise we make when we stub our toe.

One variant that continues to vex and perplex me is "again". One side of the Pond pronounces it as spelled, the othere as "agen", with a hard G. But I can't remember which, and have failed to find a helpful nmemonic.

Back to Top profile | search
 
Bill Collins
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 26 May 2005
Location: England
Posts: 8584
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 11:04am | IP Logged | 18 post reply

James,regarding `wench` as a term of endearment(Our
wench!) for a female.I was gobsmacked at Yorkshire men
calling everyone `Love` or `Luv` even fellow males!
`Oraaaaaart luv`?
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Michael Roberts
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 20 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 10937
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 11:20am | IP Logged | 19 post reply

I don't think the spelling 'ruff' is meant to indicate a rhyme with 'rough'
or 'bluff'. I have heard plenty of people pronounce the double vowel in
'roof' as if if it were the 'u' in 'put', but I've never heard 'about'
pronounced 'abut'.

-----

Ah. While the short oo sound for roof is common, I think more
Americans use the long oo, so I still wouldn't characterize the short oo
as the American way of saying it.

http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_25. html

And to get back on topic, emoji robots are creepy.
Back to Top profile | search
 
James Woodcock
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 21 September 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 3912
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 3:10pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Bill, I'm from Yorkshire and don't get the whole 'luv' thing either. And the less said about 'duck' the better.

Regarding again/agen, I say agen. I've got such bad diction


Edited by James Woodcock on 23 April 2017 at 3:10pm
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Brian O'Neill
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 13 November 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 1229
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 3:58pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply

Nobody in America pronounces it aGAIN...unless they're making fun of British accents.
JB, if you need some sort of memory aid for 'A-GAIN vs, A GHEN...I don't know...'A-GAIN rhymes with RAIN, and you'll find both throughout BriTAIN?'...apologies for any PAIN....
Back to Top profile | search
 
Neil Lindholm
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 January 2005
Location: Macau
Posts: 4129
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 4:48pm | IP Logged | 22 post reply

This episode left me somewhat cold. My main problem was with the colonists. Their first reaction, after leaving a war-torn world and hearing about what happened, is to go in guns blazing? Incredibly stupid. As a plot device it didn't do it for me. 
Back to Top profile | search | email
 
Michael Roberts
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 20 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 10937
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 5:06pm | IP Logged | 23 post reply

Their first reaction, after leaving a war-torn world and hearing about
what happened, is to go in guns blazing? Incredibly stupid.

----

Maybe I'm jaded, but I thought that was realistic and accurate. Or do
we not live on a planet edging toward yet another ground war in the
Middle East?
Back to Top profile | search
 
Steve De Young
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 01 April 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 2571
Posted: 23 April 2017 at 7:27pm | IP Logged | 24 post reply

So far, this season is reminding me a lot of the first season of NuWho, in a good way.  I wish Capaldi had been given three seasons along this line, rather than a one season epilogue to Matt Smith, a season as Clara's sidekick, and only now getting to just play the Doctor.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Bill Collins
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 26 May 2005
Location: England
Posts: 8584
Posted: 24 April 2017 at 12:16am | IP Logged | 25 post reply

The ep reminded me a tiny bit of Silent Running.
Back to Top profile | search | email
 

<< Prev Page of 9 Next >>
  Post Reply | Post New Topic |

Forum Jump

 Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login

You are currently viewing the MOBILE version of the site.
CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE FULL SITE