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Topic: The DR WHO Version Of Disrespectful Nicknames Post Reply | Post New Topic
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Robbie Parry
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Joined: 17 June 2007
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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 7:15am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

I don't own this, but this book is out:





Official timey-wimey edition?

We've discussed disrespectful nicknames for superheroes. But timey-wimey?

I take the show seriously. I want its characters and tropes to be taken seriously (it was never a comedy show). Maybe I'm overthinking it, but "timey-wimey" almost seems like the Dr. Who version of "Supes" or "Reddy".

Also, it's different, but someone I know, and I mentioned this previously, refers to William Hartnell as "Bill". Did he know Hartnell personally? No. Maybe I'm being grumpy, but I don't do that sort of thing. I'll say Hartnell or William Hartnell, but he was never a drinking buddy - so why call him "Bill"?

I don't think "timey-wimey" is a phrase I care for.


Edited by Robbie Parry on 02 September 2017 at 7:32am
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John Byrne

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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 7:42am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

We've discussed disrespectful nicknames for superheroes. But timey-wimey?

"Timey-wimey" is a phrased used on the show.

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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 7:51am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Although it is, I never quite understood how it became so popular. I can't imagine Hartnell or Troughton's Doctor using the phrase (I accept, based on what you've said, that it's not akin to the disrespectful nicknames for superheroes, it's just a pet hate).
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John Byrne

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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 8:34am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Although it is, I never quite understood how it became so popular.

I doubtless became popular from the same reason cringe-inducing names like "Supes" and "Bats" became popular. There is a big slice of fandom that LIKES nicknames for the characters that are a little bit (and sometimes a lot) disrespectful.

Consider: when the Thing calls Doctor Doom "Doomsy", he is being deliberately disrespectful; when Spider-Man called the Green Goblin "Gobby" he was showing his respect for him. That was part of the fun of the stories, along with "internal" nicknames like "Cyke", "Stretcho", "Shell-head", "Wolvie." Pros would even use them when referring to the characters in scripts. It is, after all, quicker and easier to type "Spidey" than "Spider-Man". Stan Lee did it a lot, but then there was a certain gravitas to the rest of Stan's writing that made these little flippancies work.

A problem started to arise when fans, who had themselves started using these names out there in real world, became pros who used them in the comics. I wanted to scream the first time I read a caption that describe Spider-Man using his "spidey-sense".

My basic rule: don't refer to a character by any name you would not use if you were actually speaking to that character. I mean, would you really call Batman "Bats" to his face? Are you the Joker?

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John Byrne

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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 8:35am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

PS: I have long been convinced that many of the hardcore fanboys use those deprecating nicknames to elevate themselves above the product. To declare "Sure, I read 'em, but it's not like I'm addicted!"

When, in fact, they are.

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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 8:40am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Indeed.

I'd feel the same if someone said "Kirky" about Captain Kirk. Are they saying it to elevate themselves about STAR TREK? I'm sure we could think of a million examples.
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John Byrne

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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 9:00am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

There's a level of snobbery involved, to. Notice that "important" stuff like HARRY POTTER and GAME OF THRONES doesn't get this treatment (even tho those alphabet-salad names in the latter cry out for it).
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David Miller
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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 9:39am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

In Game of Thrones, every character has in-series nicknames. It's real easy to get fanboyishly casual with the Kingslayer.

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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 9:50am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

Although it is, I never quite understood how it became so popular.

-----

It's the go-to response to any plot discussions about why the Doctor can alter the timeline in some instances, but time is immutable in others (except when he decides to change it anyway.)
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 9:51am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

In Game of Thrones, every character has in-series nicknames. It's real easy to get fanboyishly casual with the Kingslayer. 

----

Hah, in the last episode they even had Daenerys call out Jon Snow for trying to call her "Dany", which no one has except for her family (and GoT fans).
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Brian O'Neill
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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 2:00pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

'Wibbly wobbly timey wimey' was even more overused than such previous crutches as Eccleston sobbing 'I'm sorry, Rose', Captain Jack flirting with everyone, or every Doctor since 2005 being 'manic' while delivering exposition running through corridors accompanied by that damned Murray Gold soundtrack. I don't know why any of those were regular features.
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John Byrne

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Posted: 02 September 2017 at 2:21pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

In Game of Thrones, every character has in-series nicknames. It's real easy to get fanboyishly casual with the Kingslayer.

I'm aware they have job and physical description tittles, but we don't hear much of "Snowy" or "Denny," do we?

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