Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login
Star Trek MOBILE
Byrne Robotics | Star Trek Page of 2 Next >>
Topic: Size of the Crew Post Reply | Post New Topic
Author
Message
Conrad Teves
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 28 January 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 1616
Posted: 23 June 2019 at 3:51pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Image by Jim Talley on Facebook (with permission).  Done in Lightwave.
430 crew members to scale, for the purpose of animating around the interior(!).  Height varies between 5'7" and 6'1".
Seems like the ship would be pretty roomy to me.

Back to Top profile | search | www e-mail
 
John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116518
Posted: 23 June 2019 at 4:11pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

And Pike had just over 100!
Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 11854
Posted: 23 June 2019 at 4:25pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Pike had a really big ready room.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Greg Kirkman
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 15623
Posted: 23 June 2019 at 7:40pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

One of the many reasons why the TOS ship is the best is because of the scale. Just big enough to be impressive, but not so big as to lose all sense of relatable scale. The monster ships of later iterations seem less believable, somehow. Like they’re TOO theoretically big for one to suspend disbelief, almost.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 11854
Posted: 23 June 2019 at 8:49pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

I know what you mean, Greg.

It's like the strength levels of the early Thing vs the later Thing. 10 times as strong as the strongest man you'll ever meet is more conceivable than 170 times as strong as the strongest man you'll ever meet.

(also calls to mind JB's recollection of seeing Superman The Movie and the big cheer when he tears the door from the car. A certain level of super is impressive; too much super becomes less easy to grok).
Back to Top profile | search
 
Greg Kirkman
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 15623
Posted: 23 June 2019 at 9:12pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Cue Spock’s line from “The Immunity Syndrome” about it being easier to process the death of one than the death of a million. Same idea.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116518
Posted: 24 June 2019 at 4:39am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Pike had a really big ready room.

••

For a smaller crew?

Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116518
Posted: 24 June 2019 at 5:12am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

A point this raises, of course, is just how much of the interior of the Enterprise is "empty space".

We've seen plenty of empty corridors, and the crew quarters are (surprisingly) spacious. Engineering has a lot of wasted space, and the hangar deck is huge. But how much of what we don't see is actually filled up with equipment? What's BELOW Engineering, for instance. How well packed is the primary hull?

Back to Top profile | search
 
Conrad Teves
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 28 January 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 1616
Posted: 24 June 2019 at 6:00am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

The way I like to read it is that they make it roomy when the machinery lets them.  The primary hull is roomy on purpose, but (being a flat cylinder) is also volume-efficient.  Being something like 150m diameter, that makes it nearly half a kilometer around the perimeter!  Lots of room for whatever.

Then there are places where the machinery will barely allow them access.  The engineering space below from "That Which Survives" is even less ergonomic than a Jefferies Tube.   And looks rather less safe!

Aside: If I may be allowed some hyperbole, Scotty exclaiming "It's stuck!" is probably the most effective dramatic plot device that cost nothing to implement ever.  No technobabble, just a mechanical concept everyone can intuitively understand.  Stuck=bad. Works on me, anyway.
Back to Top profile | search | www e-mail
 
John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116518
Posted: 24 June 2019 at 6:30am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

I played pretty fast and loose when designing my hologram for Engineering. The spaces I defined in the ship were dictated mostly by what looked best on the model!

Back to Top profile | search
 
Eric Sofer
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 31 January 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3074
Posted: 24 June 2019 at 8:11am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

That's a big ship. Likely TOO big.

Back when I was younger (a couple years, at least), I was aware that the Apollo 9 had room for three men, and a little more. It could have been larger, but every single microgram had to be moved out of Earth gravity and in a trajectory to get to the moon.

Military craft are pretty tight, from what I'm told, with sleeping bunks, and sometimes in shifts, I suppose, in order to get the most out of that space.

Then came the Enterprise, and I saw huge corridors, pretty spacious quarters, and loads of crew and amenities. Even with replicators, 435 people use up a lot of food, water, and air. Not to mention clothing, showers  entertainment supplies*, waste facilities, laundries - everything needed in a good hotel, say. That's a lot of mass to move, and I used to wonder how it might work better if the space were halved. Those corridors could still be used; crew could double up; and such. I didn't think Engineering or the bridge could be made much smaller...

*Lisen, pal, YOU go on a five year mission with nothing to occupy yourself except working out with calisthenics, and no radio, TV, movies, or whatever entertainment is used in the 23rd century. Andon a co-ed ship... Dr. McCoy had better be up t date on natal medicine!

I wonder how powerful those impulse engines were that they could spend the energy to move those huge ships. Then we skip ahead to the Enterprise-D,  half a kilometer in length... no wonder the dilithium crystals had to be switched out so often!
Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116518
Posted: 24 June 2019 at 8:40am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Remember, the ship was not launched from the Earth’s surface.
Back to Top profile | search
 

Page of 2 Next >>
  Post Reply | Post New Topic |

Forum Jump

 Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login

You are currently viewing the MOBILE version of the site.
CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE FULL SITE