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Topic: Should Influential latter creators Get Co-Creator Credit? Post Reply | Post New Topic
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Marc Baptiste
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 June 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 3271
Posted: 04 December 2019 at 10:59pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Rodrigo,

Without Lee and Everett's Daredevil, Frank Miller's Daredevil would not exist.

That is creation vs creativity.

Marc


Edited by Marc Baptiste on 04 December 2019 at 11:00pm
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Greg McPhee
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 25 August 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 4338
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 2:58am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

Slightly different way to view this:

The original MacGyver (1985 - 1992) was created by Lee David Zlotoff. The concept, name, etc.

Zlotoff wrote the pilot script and then had no further involvement in the series. The executive producer from episode 2 to the series finale was Stephen Downing.

In interviews with writers and producers who worked on the show over the years they have stated Downing was the one who shaped the character, his background, the series direction and added recurring characters.

Now, by some of the logic in this thread, Downing did more for the series...but...it was not his concept / creation in the first place. Therefore, he doesn't get a creator credit.
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James Woodcock
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Joined: 21 September 2007
Location: United Kingdom
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Posted: 05 December 2019 at 7:32am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

I have to admit, the thing that puzzles me is when a TV show adapts a comic and the show runner, or the person that kicks the TV show off, gets a created by credit rather than a developed by credit.

Netflix Daredevil being an example. That TV show did not come from the ether, and yet the guy who bought the show to TV gets the credit and the residuals for creation. Weird
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Vinny Valenti
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Joined: 17 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 6982
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 7:38am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

"Len Wein created a hot headed teenager whose claws were in the gloves. That's not the Wolverine we have."

--

Wolverine's a unique case. The character and his alter-ego were created by 2 different people. The costume was created by John Romita, But outside of Romita's claws, the general public at large has never seen it - all they've seen is the face created by Dave Cockrum (grafted onto handsome Hugh Jackman, but still....). Shouldn't Dave get a share of the credit, then?
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 121058
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 7:38am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

Netflix Daredevil being an example. That TV show did not come from the ether, and yet the guy who bought the show to TV gets the credit and the residuals for creation. Weird

I see Hollywood ego at work there. After all, these were just comic books. The show "creators" turned them into something REAL!!!

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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 121058
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 7:42am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Wolverine's a unique case. The character and his alter-ego were created by 2 different people. The costume was created by John Romita, But outside of Romita's claws, the general public at large has never seen it - all they've seen is the face created by Dave Cockrum (grafted onto handsome Hugh Jackman, but still....). Shouldn't Dave get a share of the credit, then?

Nope.

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Michael Penn
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Joined: 12 April 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 11013
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 8:40am | IP Logged | 7 post reply


 QUOTE:
...one (!) panel...

As far as I know, and in my opinion, it's the most terribly, even horrifically sad panel in comicbook history.
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 121058
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 8:57am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

The worst part has been seeing that bone gnawed so relentlessly ever since.
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Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 12663
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 3:40pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

OK, howabout this test of the 'creation can only happen once' maxim.

In 1982, Takara released the toy below as part of its Diaclone line, designed by Kodin Ono:


A year later, Hasbro acquired the rights to this and other designs from Takara. Hasbro then went to Marvel and asked them to come up with a storyline to tie all the toys together. Denny O'Neill called this one Optimus Prime, but then handed on the project to Bob Budiansky. Budiansky decided that Optimus Prime would be the largest, strongest and wisest of all the Autobots and gave him the maxim "Freeedom is the right of all sentient beings."

It seems to me there is a minimum of two separate acts of creation happening here.
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DW Zomberg
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 June 2012
Posts: 444
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 3:48pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Fair or not, Roger Stern did "explain" how the Vulture was able to stand on his own against Spider-Man. 

The only thing Harry Osborn going on was his dad's previous weaponry and a drug-induced lunacy. 
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John Byrne

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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 121058
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 4:23pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

It seems to me there is a minimum of two separate acts of creation happening here.

I disagree.

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Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 12663
Posted: 05 December 2019 at 5:06pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

I disagree.
--------------------------
Care to elaborate? Which bit do you not see as act of creation?

One: the toy as shown which existed in 1982. Had nothing further ever happened that toy would still exist and therefore had to be created.

Two: Denny O'Neil names it Optimus Prime, creating a further identity to the already existing creation.
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