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Topic: The beginning and end of an Age Post Reply | Post New Topic
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Rodrigo castellanos
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Joined: 03 July 2012
Location: Uruguay
Posts: 549
Posted: 27 June 2020 at 1:43pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Yes master.

As an impression of Johns' attitude toward DiDio's mandates that's actually pretty good.


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Adam Schulman
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Joined: 22 July 2017
Posts: 1417
Posted: 27 June 2020 at 5:38pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

You're being obnoxious and I'm done with this conversation.
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Shawn Kane
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Joined: 04 November 2010
Location: United States
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Posted: 28 June 2020 at 6:38am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Could the early to mid-80's at Marvel be considered the Age of the Writer/Artist? I think of JB/Fantastic Four, Frank Miller/Daredevil, and Walter Simonson/Thor as long, definitive runs that sold a lot of comics. Sure, Jack Kirby did it in the 70's and Todd McFarlane in the 90's but I don't recall any other prominent writer/artists doing books during those years.
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Mike Norris
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Joined: 16 April 2004
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Posted: 28 June 2020 at 8:48pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Mike Grell was writing and drawing Warlord in the 70's. Jim Starlin was doing Warlock.. 
In the 80's Chaykin was producing American Flagg and Grell was doing Jon Sable and Starslayer. George Perez was writing and drawing Wonder Woman 
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Neil Lindholm
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Joined: 12 January 2005
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Posted: 28 June 2020 at 9:06pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

I always liked the Warlord. A shame they have not reprinted the entire series. 
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Shawn Kane
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Joined: 04 November 2010
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Posted: 29 June 2020 at 6:05am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

You're right, Mike, but my suggestion was Marvel specific. You had creators writing and doing the art on three books that sold well for the same company all around the same time period. Simonson eventually turned the art over to Sal Buscema, Miller left and came back but Mazzucchelli did the art, and JB was the only one still doing writing and art. Eventually, McFarlane got Spider-Man but the writer/artist period was over.
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John Byrne

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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Posted: 29 June 2020 at 6:23am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Eventually, McFarlane got Spider-Man but the writer/artist period was over.

•••

With a stake thru its heart!

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Andrew Bitner
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Joined: 01 June 2004
Location: United States
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Posted: 29 June 2020 at 8:16am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

JB: However we feel we have to do it, tho, we need to get rid of the Gold, Silver and Bronze labels. That’s conflating two entirely different systems of measure, the historical reference to a society’s “Golden Age” as its zenith, and the three levels of achievement seen in sporting events.

Or are we really saying the comics of DC’s rebirth in the Fifties were not as good as the comics of the Forties?

***

Great point. Can a medium go up after its Golden Age is decades past? 

I'd rather believe that every decade of comics has brought us something new, important, and innovative, moving the whole industry forward. Good stories, terrible stories... no one era is the pinnacle of comics, but there's something in each era to be appreciated and celebrated.

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Adam Schulman
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Joined: 22 July 2017
Posts: 1417
Posted: 29 June 2020 at 11:14am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

The Age thing only makes sense if we're talking about sales. The 40s & 50s were the Golden Age of comics sales. Quality? Not so much, until the EC years (which I gather aren't considered part of the Golden Age, meaning there's a tiny Age between the end of most superhero comics and Barry Allen's first appearance).
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Eric Sofer
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Joined: 31 January 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3798
Posted: 29 June 2020 at 12:48pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Adam S. - if you're discussing post Jay Garrick and pre Barry Allen, Captain Comet and J'onn J'onzz appeared then as super hero strips. Now, whether you consider those seminal or not is an entirely different matter - but there they were in the 50s.

If you include them in, I recall that Blackhawks and Challengers of the Unknown were in that gap as well. Just for discussion, not necessarily disagreement; that's what the whole topic is for! :)
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Greg McPhee
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Joined: 25 August 2004
Location: United Kingdom
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Posted: 29 June 2020 at 2:16pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

Going back to Superman, I saw the era from JB's reboot in 1986 until Dan Jurgens left with Superman # 150 in 1999, as continuous.

After Jurgens left, the titles just became haphazard and without the direction that Mike Carlin had them under. The Rucka and Simone scripted runs being exceptions.

I felt it was Geoff Johns and Kurt Busiek that really got the books back on track.
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James Woodcock
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Joined: 21 September 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 5576
Posted: 29 June 2020 at 2:47pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Johns' run was the first I read after JB left. Gary
Frank's art was a bonus.

I left when Frank left
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