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Topic: What disc did you have in last (and what did you think)? Post Reply | Post New Topic
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Brian Floyd
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 07 July 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 5976
Posted: 13 February 2018 at 1:38am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

TOP GUN? meh. Overrated. Can't believe they're doing a sequel after all these years.

My favorite Tom Cruise movie involving him in a vehicle is DAYS OF THJNDER. 
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 112193
Posted: 13 February 2018 at 5:21am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

A summer 1990 release would still require most of the filming and compilation to occur in the previous year.;)

Whenever I am accused of being pedantic, I reply with " What is wrong with being accurate and precise?"

•••

This reminds me of when some numbskull connected with the first of the recent Captain America movies said the costume had been changed to make it look like something that was designed in the Forties.

Well, I thought, after I calmed down, technically it was probably designed in 1939.

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Robbie Parry
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 June 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 11355
Posted: 14 February 2018 at 2:20pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

THE KNOWLEDGE (1979)

In real life, The Knowledge is a demanding "course" which London taxi drivers have to undertake: they must learn 320 standard routes through London and memorise 25,000 streets within a certain radius. It usually takes 34+ months to pass.

The film version is a comedy which sees assorted characters learn the Knowledge, tested by a strict administrator. From the guy using the Knowledge as an excuse to have an affair to the person who hasn't entirely been honest with authorities, it's a good comedy even if it is very much of its time.

Well worth a watch.


Edited by Robbie Parry on 14 February 2018 at 2:20pm
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Shaun Barry
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Joined: 08 December 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 5753
Posted: 19 February 2018 at 5:18pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply


INVADERS FROM MARS (1953)

It's low-budget 1950's kid stuff, but it's also much more stylish, inventive and unsettling than it has any right to be.  The DVD transfer is atrocious (Criterion really need to get their mitts on this one), but the imagery and colors still manage to pop, regardless.

I may pop this one in again in October, for some Halloween viewings with my kids.  No masterpiece, but still lots of eerie fun!





Edited by Shaun Barry on 19 February 2018 at 5:19pm
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Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 10925
Posted: 20 February 2018 at 9:26am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

The Red Shoes (1948).

On the one hand, a relatively simple tale of the conflict between an aspiring dancer having to choose between romance and career set within the milieu of an esteemed touring ballet company, on the other a sumptuous, imaginative and dark fantasy, that makes groundbreaking use of music, editing, colour and dance to tell its story.

Naturally, the most striking feature of the film is the extended dance sequence at the heart of the film... and the eerie ending. I felt a little goes out of the film in its latter part, once Vicki and Craster fall out with Lermentov, but it's certainly a memorable and visually inventive film.
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Robbie Parry
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Joined: 17 June 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 11355
Posted: 20 February 2018 at 1:59pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Shaun, I had no idea a 1953 version existed. I saw a 1986 version and I just assumed it was standalone! 
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 112193
Posted: 23 February 2018 at 7:03pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Speaking of earlier versions of movies...

MY MAN GODFREY (1936)

William Powell, Carol Lombard and a cast full of familiar faces. Clever, witty, with luminous black and white cinematography. Swerves occasionally into farce.

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Doug Centers
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 February 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3229
Posted: 23 February 2018 at 8:20pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

"Swerves occasionally into farce."

...

Yes it does, and I love it .One of my all time favorites. Powell is just so endearing.
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Doug Centers
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Joined: 17 February 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3229
Posted: 23 February 2018 at 8:33pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

MAD MAX: FURY ROAD (2015)

I avoided this one for some time, fearing the worst.
Pleasantly surprised, great action flick. The film keeps rolling along, every scene propels itself into the next.
I recommend it.
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Joe Hollon
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Joined: 08 May 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 13331
Posted: 24 February 2018 at 7:07am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

TRUE GRIT (1969)- easily my favorite of the John Wayne
movies I've seen. Now I'll have to watch the 2010
version.
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Shaun Barry
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 08 December 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 5753
Posted: 24 February 2018 at 1:05pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply


CLUE (1985)

Ever since its release, I've somehow ignored, avoided or dismissed this one for some reason or another, even barely giving it a look-see when it first hit cable (when I was in my teens, and would pretty much watch anything!)... looking back, I can only gather that I was already gravitating towards the more raunchy & adult humor of the day, and this one seemed more like an intentionally light, throwback farce, which wouldn't have been in my "wheelhouse" at the time...

33 years later, and I now understand its current cult status...there's broad humor to be sure (this would look & sound great, if translated to the stage!), but also lots of little, subtle bits of dialogue and performances throughout.  And what a cast!  I knew who most of these actors were even back in my teens--why in the world did I avoid such an ensemble??

Watched it last night with my 3 kids and we all loved it--they're enamored with the "Clue" board game, and flipped when I told them there was a movie version.  Ordered it through Netflix, and they all got sucked-in right from the get-go.  By the third act, they were almost literally rolling out on the floor, mostly due the stellar, MVP performance by Tim Curry, of who they are now all instant converts.*

Very glad I finally watched this, and my kids want to keep it for a whole 'nother week!

*(Myself, I'm now an instant convert to Colleen Camp... good gravy!  Even my kids noticed I was staring...)





Edited by Shaun Barry on 24 February 2018 at 1:08pm
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Peter Martin
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Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 10925
Posted: 24 February 2018 at 6:43pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

I found myself, not too long ago, talking about Jane Wiedlin. The people I were talking too were not familiar with the Go Gos or the solo single Rush Hour. The only way I could explain who Jane Wiedlin is, was by talking about the singing telegram girl in Clue!
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 112193
Posted: 25 February 2018 at 7:29am | IP Logged | 13 post reply

A FEW GOOD MEN (1992)

Quite a while since I last watched this one. Early Aaron Sorkin lays the groundwork for what is to follow. Jack Nicholson's "villain" is presented as a complex character, one whose "Code of Honor" has pushed him too far and ultimately betrays him.

One complaint in particular: to underscore that one of the defendants is dim-witted, it is established that he reads comicbooks.

(This is Demi Moore post-boobjob, and it makes me sad to look at her.)

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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 112193
Posted: 25 February 2018 at 7:35am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

TRUE GRIT (1969)- easily my favorite of the John Wayne movies I've seen. Now I'll have to watch the 2010 version.

••

If you have not seen it already, prepare to be disappointed. The movie LOOKS great, and Hailee Steinfeld is close to perfect as Mattie Ross, but the Coen brothers have shoehorned in too many of their own sensibilities. (The first meeting between Mattie and LaBoeuf is reset with quite disturbing results.) None of their changes enhance the story.

The John Wayne version is MUCH more faithful to the book.

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Brian Miller
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 28 July 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 25269
Posted: 25 February 2018 at 9:35am | IP Logged | 15 post reply

A FEW GOOD MEN is top five movie for me. God, I love that one. 
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Matthew Chartrand
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 June 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 1167
Posted: 25 February 2018 at 1:42pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply



ARRIVAL. Watched on HULU.  I enjoyed this movie a lot.

 
 INVISO TEXT (Click or highlight to reveal):
in the locked thread for this movie someone questioned how Amy Adams character was supposed to help the aliens. My take on this is she doesn't, she is just the first domino that needed tipping that eventually leads to humanity being able to help in 3,000 years.

  The choice with her daughter. To me, there isn't one. If one of my kids were to die my thought would not be, "gee I wish she was never born
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 112193
Posted: 25 February 2018 at 2:41pm | IP Logged | 17 post reply

ARRIVAL

•••

Again, a reminder that a key point of this movie is based on flawed reasoning. (An alien language is like a code that can be broken.). The real world sees things differently. Ever hear of the Rosetta stone?

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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 112193
Posted: 25 February 2018 at 10:06pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

James Bond "double feature," DR. NO and FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE.
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Robbie Parry
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 June 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 11355
Posted: 26 February 2018 at 5:55am | IP Logged | 19 post reply

The first Bond films I watched were gadget-heavy and featured globe-trotting exploits (Moore Era). It wasn't until later in life that I watched DR. NO.

At the time, it felt a tad underwhelming. There were fewer gadgets and less globe-trotting. It felt a little pedestrian compared to what I had watched.

But I came to love it. When I rewatched it, I appreciated it even more. It's solid. It's a proper spy drama. And it definitely deserves to be given much credit.

Been years since I've seen FRWL, so I may rewatch that soon.
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Michael Penn
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Joined: 12 April 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 10201
Posted: 26 February 2018 at 6:21am | IP Logged | 20 post reply

DR. NO is my favorite Bond movie precisely because it is compared to later films in the series so much more primitive and primal and another apt "pri-" word too, I'm sure. 

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE is what I consider the best movie, as a movie. 

And GOLDFINGER is in my opinion the most perfect Bond movie, where all the elements of the what became the standard essential mythology were at 100%.
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 112193
Posted: 26 February 2018 at 7:25am | IP Logged | 21 post reply

A good summation, Michael.

As I have mentioned many a time, GOLDFINGER is the one I point to when it comes to translating a book to film. All the essential plot and character elements are there, but "bigger", as the screen demands.

The first two movies are, of course, the most faithful to the books.

(Watching RUSSIA I was looking up details on the IMDb and was saddened to learn that Pedro Armendαriz, who plays Kerim Bey, was suffering from terminal cancer at the time, and died shortly after filming wrapped.)*

––––––––––––––––––

* Suicide in the face of an otherwise lingering death.

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David Miller
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Joined: 16 April 2004
Posts: 2050
Posted: 26 February 2018 at 9:58am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

DR. NO is almost refreshing in its small scale. It's tempting to imagine the alternate universe where the series didn't take off and this film stood alone as an idiosyncratic and brutal take on the genre, rather than remaking thrillers in its own image. 

That scene where has sex with one of No's henchwomen, then rolls out of bed and hands her to the police, is about as cold-blooded and caddish as Bond gets. 
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Robbie Parry
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 June 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 11355
Posted: 26 February 2018 at 11:30am | IP Logged | 23 post reply

I won't turn this into a Bond novel thread, but here's an interesting blog entry:



Edited by Robbie Parry on 26 February 2018 at 11:31am
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Brian Rhodes
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 19 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 2893
Posted: 26 February 2018 at 11:50am | IP Logged | 24 post reply

If you somehow haven't seen either*, A FEW GOOD MEN sounds a lot like TOP GUN on paper: Tom Cruise plays a young military guy with a lot of talent who lives in the shadow of his father.

But, that's where the similarity ends. I'm not a Cruise fan. I will see a movie despite him being in it rather than because. But, he's quite good in this. Of course, Nicholson is fantastic. A strong cast, all around.

No sappy, happy ending. No obligatory romance. No slo-mo oily volleyball. Tight script, solid performances, great pace.

*Skip TOP GUN. Watch A FEW GOOD MEN.

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Peter Martin
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Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 10925
Posted: 26 February 2018 at 8:17pm | IP Logged | 25 post reply

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966).

Taylor is really very good, in a hideous way, and totally deserved her Best Actress Oscar for her performance as Martha, while Burton is even better as the put-upon, yet equally-cruel George. The scene where George recounts his visit to a gin-mill is particularly brilliant, Burton just totally commanding the viewer's attention with nothing but his voice.
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