Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login
Star Trek MOBILE
Byrne Robotics | Star Trek << Prev Page of 23 Next >>
Topic: Watching some TOS . . . Locked Post Reply | Post New Topic
Author
Message
Brian Hague
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 14 November 2006
Posts: 6894
Posted: 25 March 2013 at 10:54pm | IP Logged | 1  

Another view of Spock's embattled childhood on Vulcan, this time from the perspective of the Gold Key comic series:

Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Greg Kirkman
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 14114
Posted: 26 March 2013 at 1:58am | IP Logged | 2  

Ah, those wacky Gold Key comics!

I've occasionally considered picking up the trades, just for the historical-
-and wonderfully, hilariously bizarre--novelty value. But they'd need to
be pretty cheap for me to really go for 'em.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 108492
Posted: 26 March 2013 at 5:26am | IP Logged | 3  

I picked up the trade collection of the first few Gold Key TREK comics, since it contained the ones I had actually bought, and had some really good art.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 9980
Posted: 26 March 2013 at 6:20pm | IP Logged | 4  

This is also one of the two episodes (the other being "Space Seed") which very clearly establish TOS as being set in the 22nd Century, something later forgotten.
---------------------------------------------- 
I did note that line about locking Kirk up for 200 years and the reply that that would be just about right.

Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 108492
Posted: 26 March 2013 at 6:57pm | IP Logged | 5  

It is truly astonishing, the number of fans who insist Kirk's reaction to the "200 years" line is equally applicable if he's from the 23rd Century. Really!

I wonder how many of those fans, if asked if they were born in the 19th Century, would answer "Close enough"?

Back to Top profile | search
 
Rick Senger
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 7772
Posted: 27 March 2013 at 12:39pm | IP Logged | 6  

I bought the dvd-rom version from Amazon for a song (maybe $10?)  It features the whole 1967 - 2002 comics universe including all the Gold Key, Marvel, DC, Wildstorm, Malibu and even Peter Pan comics and records with Adams art including annuals and some other bonuses.  I just realized I'd upgraded to Win 7 since buying it some years back but a nervous click just revealed it still opens and works.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
David Miller
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Posts: 1736
Posted: 27 March 2013 at 3:54pm | IP Logged | 7  

Hulu is streaming TOS for free this week. 
Back to Top profile | search | www e-mail
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 9980
Posted: 05 April 2013 at 3:36pm | IP Logged | 8  

Return of the Archons: a fascinating set-up (the bit with the clock striking the hour and everyone going crazy I remember well, the rest of the episode had faded from my memory), and Landru is both an interesting mystery and a spooky presence. Not crazy about the resolution. Would have made more sense to me if Kirk could have demonstrated prima facie evidence that the computer's presence was damaging the society rather than just Kirk's unsubtantiated claim causing Landru to self-destruct.

Space Seed: a classic. Ricardo Montalban is first rate, but I also find Leonard Nimoy to be brilliant in this one, with Spock very well written.

Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 9980
Posted: 09 April 2013 at 8:34pm | IP Logged | 9  

Got through A Taste of Armageddon, This Side of Paradise and The Devil in the Dark in the last few days.

A Taste of Armageddon is a good, original idea, but I feel that idea was stretched a little thin over the course of the whole episode.

This Side of Paradise adds quite a lot of depth to the chief triumverate. Absolutely love the little exchange where Kirk and McCoy discuss Spock's odd behaviour ("I thought you said you might like him if he mellowed a little"). 

The Devil in the Dark is one of those episodes that is burned into my brain. I must have seen this one multiple times as a child. And it's a pretty good one. I like the juggling act it portrays of trying to do the right thing balanced against the very real risk of being killed -- Spock doesn't blindly stick to wanting to do the noble thing. He vacillates, at first wanting to defend the creature, but switches to advising killing it when faced with the risk of Kirk being killed. And then the mantel of doing the right thing passes on to Kirk. 




Edited by Peter Martin on 09 April 2013 at 8:34pm
Back to Top profile | search
 
Greg Kirkman
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 14114
Posted: 09 April 2013 at 9:24pm | IP Logged | 10  

Space Seed: a classic. Ricardo Montalban is first rate, but I also find
Leonard Nimoy to be brilliant in this one, with Spock very well written.
++++++++++++++++

I think everyone's well-written in that one. The dialogue and interplay
between the characters just crackles. Gene Coon-penned episodes
like this one really made the characters shine.

Indeed, "Space Seed" was one of the first episodes I ever saw, and
the dialogue and interplay really made the characters come alive to me
as a kid.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 108492
Posted: 10 April 2013 at 4:38am | IP Logged | 11  

"Space Seed" is an interesting lesson for science-fiction writers: don't pick dates that are too close -- and just about anything less than 100 years is too close!

Khan's Eugenics Wars were in the 1990, which were about 30 years away when the episode first aired, but I look back now and realize just how fast those years slid away. It might have seemed perfectly reasonable when Gene Coon wrote his script, that the world could change that much, so quickly -- after all, it was changing at a pretty rapid clip at the time, and seeming to be accelerating -- but in the end the lesson of history points to an overall "sameness". In specific, the details change, but the broad strokes remain pretty much the same.

Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 9980
Posted: 10 April 2013 at 9:04pm | IP Logged | 12  

Watched Errand of Mercy yesterday -- strangely I remember John Colicos' Commander Kor very well from having watched this one before but had no memory of the nature of the Organians. For once we have beings with god-like powers who actually are far above humans in understanding, knowledge, etc. The episode does raise an interesting quandary about free will and I like Kirk's  bemusement at his own demands to be allowed to fight a war that he never wanted. Colicos was pretty good and the episode has its moments, but the overt militarism of Kirk and Starfleet here sits uneasily with me. The Prime Directive seemed to be of little concern to Kirk here -- nor the beginning of galactic war. I far preferred the depth of Balance of Terror, where the crew were troubled by the weight of their actions.

Edited by Peter Martin on 10 April 2013 at 9:05pm
Back to Top profile | search
 
Eric Smearman
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 02 September 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 5284
Posted: 10 April 2013 at 10:56pm | IP Logged | 13  

It's been forever since I've watched TOS. This thread is making me
want to do some revisiting of my own.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Rick Senger
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 7772
Posted: 11 April 2013 at 10:37am | IP Logged | 14  

For once we have beings with god-like powers who actually are far above humans in understanding, knowledge, etc. The episode does raise an interesting quandary about free will and I like Kirk's  bemusement at his own demands to be allowed to fight a war that he never wanted. Colicos was pretty good and the episode has its moments, but the overt militarism of Kirk and Starfleet here sits uneasily with me. The Prime Directive seemed to be of little concern to Kirk here -- nor the beginning of galactic war.
*****
For me this is one of the better and more thought-provoking first season episodes, though I do think some of the "cowboy diplomacy" caricature of Kirk may have its origins here.  I get the sense Coon etal were trying to couch a racism message with Kirk's apparent ingrained dislike of Klingons, though given Kor's and the Klingons actions in the episode, it's easy to see why Kirk feels this way.  Still, the "it is true that in the future, you and the Klingons will become fast friends" line packs a powerful punch, as does the reveal that the seemingly docile and primitive Organians are actually the far more advanced civilization.  If Kirk violates the Prime Directive, though, the Organian revelation about the future relations of the Federation and Klingons sure feels like a questionable thing to reveal, as well. 

I far preferred the depth of Balance of Terror, where the crew were troubled by the weight of their actions.
*****
Balance is certainly one of the stronger first season episodes and also has a more direct racism mesage, though obviously in a different context.  For me the difference in Kirk's attitude about the prospects of war there is that he wasn't sure about the Romulans (the Federation hadn't encountered them in a century, after all), but in Errand of Mercy he already had firsthand experience with Klingons and felt confident in his judgment of their character and intentions. 

("Gentlemen, I have seen what the Klingons do to planets like yours. They are organised into vast slave labour camps. No freedoms whatsoever. Your goods will be confiscated. Hostages taken and killed, your leaders confined. You'd be far better off on a penal planet. Infinitely better off." )
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 9980
Posted: 13 April 2013 at 6:34pm | IP Logged | 15  

The Alternative Factor -- bit of a confusing mess for the most part. I didn't like how Kirk and Spock seem to infer so much (and so specifically) without much data. The special effects sequence when Lazarus interacts with the time-corridor are over-used and eventually become just annoying. The anti-matter Lazarus counterpart steals some dilithium crystals to stop Lazarus -- but why not explain what's going on to the crew instead and ask for help? I did quite like Robert Brown's performance and Kirk's ruminations at the end on having a madman at your throat for all eternity was quite powerful, but not a good episode.

Edited by Peter Martin on 13 April 2013 at 6:35pm
Back to Top profile | search
 
Greg Kirkman
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 14114
Posted: 14 April 2013 at 9:48am | IP Logged | 16  

A good chunk of that episode is padding because a subplot involving
Lazarus romancing Lieutenant Masters was cut.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 9980
Posted: 18 April 2013 at 2:20pm | IP Logged | 17  

Operation: Annihilate! An odd title, but a fondly-remembered episode.

This is perhaps the episode I remember most clearly from my youth along with The City on the Edge of Forever (which I've skipped out watching for the moment, as I'm trying to persuade my girlfriend to watch it with me).

This one has some flaws but I still like it. The interactions between the leading triumverate are memorable, with Spock having a lot of great moments. Scotty has a good moment too when he stops Spock beaming down to the planet. The way the pathos is cranked up by Spock's stoic nature and the reactions of those around him is something that was well-utilised later in The Wrath of Khan (even to the extent of having a blind Spock walking into an object).
Back to Top profile | search
 
Shaun Barry
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 08 December 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 5336
Posted: 18 April 2013 at 7:08pm | IP Logged | 18  

Ah yes... "Operation--Annihilate!"  One of my Top 3 TREK episodes that totally gave me the willies as a kid, right after "Arena" and "The Galileo Seven."  The unbearable tension in all three of these episodes was almost too much to take, when you're only about 7 or 8 years old!

 

Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 9980
Posted: 19 April 2013 at 8:01am | IP Logged | 19  

The buzzing noise and the idea of the blobs leaving a very painful stinger in Spock's back did have a very visceral effect on me as a child.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Rick Senger
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 7772
Posted: 19 April 2013 at 9:19am | IP Logged | 20  

Growing up my brother and I referred to this as the flying fake throw-up episode.  The sensation of something slapping my back and zapping me in tandem with the buzzing sound was a recurring childhood nightmare, though.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 108492
Posted: 19 April 2013 at 12:10pm | IP Logged | 21  

This was one of the Super-Spock episodes. "Oh, yes, I have this [SPOILER] I never mentioned before (nor will ever mention again)..."
Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 9980
Posted: 20 April 2013 at 5:39pm | IP Logged | 22  

Amok Time. The second season gets off to a strong start. Love the music in this episode. It adds quite a bit of Vulcan mythos (which episode did they stop being Vulcanians and become just Vulcans?), most of which I raelly enjoyed, although it would appear to me that they appear to have quite barbaric customs for a non-violent race. I know they date back to the old time, but I wonder why such a logical race would adhere to these traditions.

I like how it's McCoy's wiliness that saves the day and Spock's reaction at the end definitely proves he is normally in control of his emotions rather than being devoid of them. 
Back to Top profile | search
 
Rick Senger
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 7772
Posted: 21 April 2013 at 10:15am | IP Logged | 23  

Amok is top three all-time for me.  It's a keystone in the relationship (and loyalty) of the Big Three, and just about invulnerable to criticism because what it does well it does brilliantly.  Most tv shows attempt to bond their characters at some point but a lot of the time it comes across as artificial.  Amok raises the stakes believably and beautifully and everyone acts just as we would want them to.  Kirk's sussing out Spock's desperate situation is one example...he's initially rightly miffed/threatened by Spock's countermand of his order but shows discretion in calling him on it in private ("Mr. Spock, come with me please"), then gradually realizes what is really at stake and rapidly reverses course and risks everything from his career to his neck for Spock. 

Spock's "traditionally the male is accompanied by his closest friends...I also request McCoy" and McCoy's "I shall be honored, sir" is one of the most touching moments in that relationship and McCoy rewards Spock's vulnerable acknowledgement with his Kirk (and Spock) saving Triox compound gambit... one of McCoy's cleverest moves in the entire series.  There are so many great Spock moments, but Nimoy's emotional reveal at the end ("JIMMM!") is an incredibly satisfying release after the deadly seriousness of the rest of the episode.  McCoy gets one of his best rejoinders in, maybe the only argument he ever wins over Spock ("in a pig's eye!")

All of the Vulcan culture and traditions are fascinating and well-thought out.  For me, this is classic television and the essence Trek at its best.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne

Beam Me Up, Scotty!

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 108492
Posted: 21 April 2013 at 11:56am | IP Logged | 24  

To my 17 year old eyes, Arlene Martel was STAGGERINGLY HOT as T'Pring. That alone wins some brownie points for "Amok Time".
Back to Top profile | search
 
Anthony J Lombardi
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 12 January 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 9411
Posted: 21 April 2013 at 2:23pm | IP Logged | 25  

To my 17 year old eyes, Arlene Martel was STAGGERINGLY HOT as T'Pring. That alone wins some brownie points for "Amok Time".
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 My 40 year old eyes agree with you. Star Trek had some of the most beautiful women on that show. 
Back to Top profile | search
 

<< Prev Page of 23 Next >>
  Post Reply | Post New Topic |

Forum Jump

 Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login

You are currently viewing the MOBILE version of the site.
CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE FULL SITE