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Greg Kirkman
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Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 14347
Posted: 06 December 2017 at 12:27am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Yeah, Vogt is among the very few to acquit himself well in the film...and then he had to quit halfway through, and ended up being replaced by another character/actor!

I own a copy of the script, and "Peter" is literally crossed-out and replaced with handwritten "Steven"s in the film's later scenes.


Anyway, THE DISASTER ARTIST has already made a million dollars after being released in a mere 19 theaters prior to the wide release that will happen on Friday. That's really impressive.
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Ed Aycock
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Joined: 05 May 2004
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Posted: 06 December 2017 at 11:38am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

I can really get into bad movies- "Valley of the Dolls" is an all time favorite (what Susan Sontag would label as "true camp" as it was made with true intentions and not to be deliberately bad) and I am a huge fan of John Waters early works with maybe the exception of "Desperate Living." But there's just something about "The Room" that I cannot enjoy unless it's in small doses.  Maybe because it's beyond bad.  Or should really only be watched with others.  It's artless/formless. 
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Ted Downum
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Joined: 21 April 2004
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Posted: 07 December 2017 at 9:20am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

I don't know quite where to fall on The Room. My taste in bad movies runs more toward the big-budget Hollywood production that results in bizarre, ludicrous failure: Exorcist II: The Heretic, Showgirls, The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996 "Brando's Midget" version), and so forth.

The Room definitely has a huge number of puzzling and unintentionally funny moments, and Wiseau by himself is weird enough to keep you watching, but the film's sheer earnestness and lack of irony also made me feel terrible for everyone involved...a feeling amplified when I read Greg Sestero's book.

I'm looking forward to the Franco film, which opens near me this weekend, but I wonder if any fictional portrayal could truly do justice to the events Sestero described.
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Matt Hawes
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Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
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Posted: 07 December 2017 at 12:52pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

I keep hearing great reviews, and nearly every one of them point out how Franco celebrates the independent spirit of filmmakers like Wiseau. It is something that despite his shortcomings as a filmmaker, Wiseau still has unquestionably become a success with his film.

This is a fine distinction from what happened with Ed Wood. The cult like following of "Plan 9 From Outer Space" didn't seem to take off until after Wood was gone. I'm sure that he never profited from the film in any real way, but Tommy Wiseau has become a celebrity and has reaped benefits from his own movie.
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Matt Hawes
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Joined: 16 April 2004
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Posted: 08 December 2017 at 12:54am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

LOL!

THE ROOM as a Prince song!




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Greg Kirkman
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Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 14347
Posted: 08 December 2017 at 1:12am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

The Room definitely has a huge number of puzzling and unintentionally funny moments, and Wiseau by himself is weird enough to keep you watching, but the film's sheer earnestness and lack of irony also made me feel terrible for everyone involved...a feeling amplified when I read Greg Sestero's book.
+++++++++

There's a fascinating mixture of hilarity and pathos to the whole thing. It's bizarre and clumsy enough to be unintentionally hilarious, but it's also at times mortifying to watch, especially when you consider what the actors and crew went through. 
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Matt Hawes
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Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 13942
Posted: 10 December 2017 at 12:16am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

"You're Tearing Me Apart" music video.


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Matt Hawes
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Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 13942
Posted: 10 December 2017 at 6:42pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

Franco on Jimmy Fallon's "Tonight Show":

LINK.


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Greg Kirkman
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Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 14347
Posted: 10 December 2017 at 10:53pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

RedLetterMedia's review, which is mixed-to-negative:



I saw the film, today, and I find myself agreeing with a number of RLM's points. THE DISASTER ARTIST is fun and entertaining, but rather slight, especially in comparison to the book. A lot of interesting details are condensed, omitted, or embellished. It feels more surface-level than it shoud, although it does (eventually) get into Wiseau's darker traits.

This is more of a loving tribute to THE ROOM and its mythos than it is a deep exploration of Wiseau and Sestero's friendship. That friendship--and its many ups and downs--is the key to what makes the book work. The movie glosses over some of the messier details in favor of celebrating the wacky spirit of do-or-die independent filmmaking, which is clearly what attracted Franco and Rogen to the project.

Franco pretty much disappears into the guise of Wiseau, and it's at times surreal to watch. I wouldn't be too surprised if he got an Oscar nomination. Dave Franco is clearly having fun, but he doesn't quite capture the energy of Sestero. Movie-Sestero comes off as rather naive, whereas the book presents him more as someone who suffers through all of Tommy's eccentricities for the sake of preserving their friendship.

Lots of celebrity cameos, lots of fun moments. The actual cast of THE ROOM is rather underserved, with the focus being almost entirely on Wiseau and Sestero. This is more of a ROOM fanfilm-tribute than it is a work which stands on its own. For fans, there's a lot to enjoy, but I wonder how people who aren't aware of THE ROOM and its backstory will take it.

Tommy's cameo comes in a fun little post-credits scene, although he also appears at the end of the film proper, which presents side-by-side comparisons of scenes from THE ROOM with Franco's recreations of them.


All in all, the film is definitely worth a look, but not quite a knockout. As RLM notes, it feels like there's a better and deeper movie than could have been made from this material. The book is better than the movie. I'd give it a solid "B".
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