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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 09 April 2018 at 10:42am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

I thought the Enterprise crew looked much better in the DS9/VOY era uniforms. Tho' I'm not sure I'd describe them as a 'class B' uniform compared to the TNG uniform. 
++++++++

Mind you, I’m not saying that they were literally supposed to be “class B” uniforms for the TNG crew, but rather that their infrequent use in GENERATIONS reminded me of the use of actual “class B” uniforms and short-sleeved p/long-sleeved fatigues from THE MOTION PICTURE. After all, the initial DS9 variant of the Starfleet uniform was ostensibly designed by Bob Blackman as utilitarian jumpsuits for use aboard an alien space station, rather than as Starfleet’s standard uniforms. 

As noted, the real-world reason for the jumpsuits was to give DS9 a flavor distinct from TNG, and probably also for merchandising reasons. 
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Brian Rhodes
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Posted: 09 April 2018 at 10:47am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

True. Picard had been established as a horse guy, but Kirk, not so much.

GENERATIONS is mostly disappointing. It undoes what I thought were great send-offs for both crews (TUC and "All Good Things...")

Not without its flaws (so, not ALL good things), the TNG series finale is still better than most I've seen. The poker game...Picard looks into the faces of his crew..."I should have done this a long time ago." Right up there with "His was the most....Huuman."  Emotional payoffs that only come with the history we know - and have seen - these characters have. 




Edited by Brian Rhodes on 09 April 2018 at 5:20pm
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 09 April 2018 at 10:49am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

In all it comes to one incredible rookie mistake, writing-wise: basing one's whole story on something the audience know isn't true (Kirk in the Nexus).
+++++++

In regards to the continuity error with Scotty seemingly being unaware of Kirk’s fate in “Relics”, Moore and Braga have stated that they deliberately allowed the mistake to happen in order to have James Doohan appear as Scotty in the film (...and also because Nimoy and Kelley had declined). 

The treatment of Kirk in GENERATIONS marks the beginning of what became a staple of the TNG movies: ignoring certain established bits of continuity and characterization in favor of making the movies more action-oriented and moviegoer-friendly. Picard becoming an action hero during the next few films (and being obsessed with revenge against the Borg in FIRST CONTACT) is the incongruity people most often cite when discussing the TNG films.
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Tony Tower
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Posted: 09 April 2018 at 2:04pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Of course, within five minutes of Dickensian fun, [Picard] sees through the fantasy (something no one else, including Guinan and F***ING CAPTAIN JAMES T. KIRK was ever able to do) and wants out.

---

I've seen this objection raised before on this board. It's extremely obvious to me why Picard could do this when no one else could - Picard is the only one who went into the Nexus knowing what the Nexus was and what it did. And he had a compelling reason to leave (save the Enterprise/Veridian III), which neither the mourning El Aurian refugees or restless retiree Kirk did. 


Edited by Tony Tower on 09 April 2018 at 2:06pm
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 09 April 2018 at 6:43pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

... ride horses all day or spend time in a cabin in the mountains, but nothing we had seen of Kirk's backstory made either of those fantasies authentic.

It just dawned on me Kirk's horse-riding and villain-defeating fantasies are actually just a rehash of Pike's Talosian-induced fantasies from "The Cage".   

Make of that what you will!
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Bill Collins
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Posted: 09 April 2018 at 11:53pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

I thought Kirk`s horse riding fantasy was Shatner
bringing in HIS love of horses, or the writers tributing
it?

Edited by Bill Collins on 09 April 2018 at 11:53pm
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 10 April 2018 at 12:47am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Seems pretty clear to me that the horse stuff was a case of the producers appeasing Shatner so he’d agree to appear in the film. Also, David Carson, unlike Nimoy and Nick Meyer, was clearly unable to properly wrangle Shatner. As a result, there’s more of Shatner onscreen than there is of Kirk in GENERATIONS.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 10 April 2018 at 1:53am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

STAR TREK: FIRST CONTACT (the movie, not the episode, 1996).



Unquestionably the best of the TNG films, and just a plain great film. I must qualify that statement, however—there’s plenty to nitpick, in regards to judging it as a great STAR TREK and/or TNG film. The story makes certain concessions and breaks in continuity for the sake of the moviegoing experience. That being said, FIRST CONTACT is a wonderful popcorn movie: fun, funny, action-packed, and full of thrill and chills. Tons of memorable lines and moments, too, particularly Picard’s iconic “The line must be drawn he-ah!” speech. 

I had a great time seeing this one in the theater, back in the day. After the misfire of GENERATIONS, this film really fired on all cylinders. Jonathan Frakes definitely knocked it out of the park with his first feature directing gig. The movie looks lovely, Jerry Goldsmith’s score is fantastic, and ILM’s effects are gorgeous.

It’s clear that, after GENERATIONS, Berman, Moore, and Braga wanted to give the TNG crew a proper popcorn-movie adventure all their own, with elements of the best of TREKs past sprinkled in. So, we have the Borg, time-travel (used so successfully in THE VOYAGE HOME), and dashes of Moby Dick (which evokes THE WRATH OF KHAN).

Now, in terms of being proper TNG, there are issues. Patrick Stewart is great in this film, but Picard as an action hero who wants revenge on the Borg feels more than a little out of character. After all, Picard was shown to have recovered from his assimilation during TNG, and had encountered the Borg several times after he was severed from the collective. It should also be noted that Stewart himself had suggested that the film’s A and B stories be flip-flopped, with Picard fighting the Borg aboard the ship instead of Riker, and Riker making the first warp flight with Cochrane instead of Picard.

Speaking of Cochrane, he’s another nitpick. The character in no way whatsoever resembles the Zefram Cochrane of Alpha Centauri we’d previously seen in “Metamorphosis”. That being said, James Cromwell is great (as are the other key guest-stars, Alfre Woodard and Alice Krige). More importantly, there is absolutely a case to be made that Moore and Braga basically used Cochrane as a sort of meta-examination of Gene Roddenberry: a very flawed man who changed the world, and was hailed as a visionary and a genius. There a number of moments in the script which strongly point in that direction.

As noted, Alfre Woodard is great, and Lily makes for a very engaging audience-viewpoint character. We also have a young Neal McDonough as the ill-fated Lieutenant Hawk, and fun cameos from Robert Picardo as the Enterprise-E’s EMH, Ethan Phillips as a holo-host, and Dwight Schultz as Barclay.

Meanwhile, there’s also the first and best of the movie series’ contrivances to bring Worf back into the fold, since he was at this time a regular on DS9. I can’t really argue with that, since Worf/Michael Dorn is a key part of the family, and it wouldn’t feel right to leave him out. It’s fun to have a mini-DS9 crossover, too, with the Defiant being involved in the battle for Earth. ILM also snuck the Millennium Falcon into the opening battle, for those paying close attention.

Alice Krige is great as the Borg Queen. Of course, the whole idea of the character is antithetical to the concept of the Borg and what we know about them, but this was obviously a concession to the needs of movies vs. television. A central villain was necesssry for both exposition and the dramatic needs of an action film. It also feels more than a bit ALIENS-ish, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing for an action film. That being said, I came away with a new reading of the character, this time around: Perhaps she’s not so much an individual in charge of the Borg as she is a...distillation of the Borg used for communication. The personification of the collective contained in one body, which speaks in the first person. Which would explain her desire for a counterpart in Locutus. She’s a Borg who comes across as more human than the average drone, and Locutus was a human who became a Borg so as to serve as an intermediary. Both of them are attempts to bridge the gap and prepare humanity for assimilation.

Anyway, the scenes where the Queen literally tempts Data with the pleasures of the flesh are well-done and properly creepy. There’s also that fun callback to Data’s first and only sexual experience, from “The Naked Now”. Brent Spiner gets a lot of fun moments to play in this film, and the Oscar-nominated makeup effects for both the Borg and the flesh-covered Data are great.

The film also helps to give the Borg some of their teeth back, after their latter-day TNG appearances had made them less terrifying than they initially were. Frakes plays up the zombie-movie vibe with the lighting effects and Borg-vision shots, and it’s all very moody and effective.

The choice of setting for the time-travel story—essentially, the origins of STAR TREK as we know it, with the first warp flight from Earth—is a clever one. The film’s plot is really very simple, and the story hits the ground running, and yet it still feels like a satisfying meal. The setpieces are great (the spacewalk/zero-g combat sequence is a very memorable one), the story is always clear and well-paced, and the main cast all get good moments to play.

I also dig the re-redesigned uniforms, which are a bit grittier and more militaristic than the DS9-style jumpsuits. I’ve always been a bit “meh” on the Enterprise-E design, but the interior sets are well-designed and well-shot. There’s also that nice, subtle moment where the camera lingers for a second on the broken (saucer-separated, evoking GENERATIONS) model of the Enterprise-D in the conference lounge, after Lily talks Picard out of blowing up the ship.


As a moviegoing experience, this is a really fun ride. There may be problems when examined in the larger context of TNG, but the pros vastly outweigh the cons. Love it!
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 10 April 2018 at 5:51am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

The setpieces are great (the spacewalk/zero-g combat sequence is a very memorable one)

There's something very TMP-ish about the deflector dish sequence, in both direction and sound design.   

I also dig the re-redesigned uniforms, which are a bit grittier and more militaristic than the DS9-style jumpsuits

I do as well.   It's amazing how much influence FIRST CONTACT has had on all subsequent STAR TREK  -- both visually and conceptually.   It was amazing to see the movie uniforms showing up in DS-9 (and subsequently not on VOYAGER, which makes sense).    The look of ENTERPRISE from the uniforms to the ships is clearly FC-inspired.   The redesigned Borg carried over to VOYAGER and continue to influence not just STAR TREK but other sci-fi and other genres.
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 10 April 2018 at 6:05am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

One other thing FC did was establish that it was ok to go 'off script' with regards to continuity if it meant telling an exciting story.   Even the title is recycled from a TV episode of the same name.   They were all set to make Zefram Cochrane female until someone pointed out that he had already been depicted on screen.  

After FC any semblance of a consistency is thrown out the window: Picard is now bald in his youth rather than the multiple times we've seen where he did have some hair   The silly contrivances to get Worf back for 'just one more story' get even more ludicrous.   Data suddenly has another prototype.   ENTERPRISE just seemed to be making up it's own STAR TREK lore and DISCOVERY is still running with that ball.   Then we get to the Abrams films and the entire bathroom is thrown out -- masking both the baby and the bathwater.

FC is not the first STAR TREK to break continuity but it's certainly the most entertaining worst offender!


Edited by Rob Ocelot on 10 April 2018 at 6:07am
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 10 April 2018 at 9:20am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

I don’t think it’s a stretch to say that FIRST CONTACT might just represent the apex of Berman-era TREK. A hugely successful (and, as you note, influential) film—both critically and financially—produced at a time when DS9 and VOYAGER were both chugging along. It was the last great story to come out of TNG. The franchise slowly began losing steam, afterwards. 
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 1:47am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

STAR TREK: INSURRECTION (1998).


The only real crime of this film is that it’s average. Not great, not awful. Just average. Of the TNG films, this is the only one I didn’t bother to see in the theater. Indeed, the only time I ever saw it in its entirety (until now) was when it came out on VHS, back in the day. I remember that a friend was following news and spoiler reports prior to the film’s release, and that he told me the film was rumored to have a scene where Data was used as a floatation device in the event of a water landing, and Worf got a pimple. I laughed those ideas off as false rumors. Wrongly, as it turns out.

Cut this movie down to an hour, and you’d have a solid TNG episode. I find it interesting that fans tend to take issue with the TNG films for being more action-oriented than the show, and tested the characters into action heroes and/or comedy relief. Yet, some of those same fans dismiss this film because it isn’t “big” enough. 

The TNG movies were a sort of lose-lose proposition, really. The big advantage of the TOS movies was that there were all after the fact of TOS, and could deal with different subject matter. They weren’t just more of STAR TREK, the TV series. TMP was a reunion movie. TWOK dealt with Kirk’s midlife crisis. TSFS was about Kirk sacrificing his ship and his career for his friends. TVH was a fun romp in the spirit of TOS. TFF was a failed attempt at a (third season-ish) TOS-type story. TUC was the wrap-up. 

By and large, the TOS movies featured the crew in their golden years, dealing with different issues. No more five-year mission. Things had changed. The TNG movies, on the other hand, began literally months after the end of the series, and were business as usual, but BIGGER. As a result you have the same characters and premise of the TV show, but with the needs and expections of a tentpole movie series thrust upon them. GENERATIONS and FIRST CONTACT both tried to be the epic action movie versions of the TV series, but that goes against what the show was about.

Thus, ironically, INSURRECTION’s attempt to be lighter, talkier, and more thoughtful resulted in its being the most insubstantial and “meh” of the film. Yet, it feels very much like a (bloated) episode. Michael Piller wrote the script, and it comes across as a solid third season-ish episode of TNG, and a sort of hybrid of “Who Watches The Watchers?”, “Homeward”, and “Journey’s End”. 

The subject matter and themes are all very much TNG: an ethical dilemma involving forced relocation of a small population of people, an examination of fears about aging, etc. Yet, it doesn’t feel BIG enough to justify a movie. The ideas are there, but they somehow don’t come across in a satisfying or engaging way.

There are some nice moments and ideas, though. The humor works in some spots, but largely doesn’t. Riker and Troi finally get back together, and we see beardless Riker (aside from the stock footage in the series finale) for the first time since the first season. LeVar Burton beautifully plays the scene were Geordi—now with functioning eyes—watches the sun (which is a lovely reference to “The Naked Now”). I do have to wonder how the metaphasic radiation could corrected the genetic birth defect of Geordi’s blindness, though. Regenerating existing DNA is not the same thing as rewriting it to correct a fundamental error, after all. I also have to wonder why Geordi is suddenly back to having artificial eyes in the next film, too. Also, Burton finally gets to wear his beard, and, combined with the contact lenses to depict Geordi’s replacement eyes, it’s a good look for the character.

Worf just happens to be on leave from DS9 so he can hang out with the old gang. More importantly, this film takes place during DS9’s Dominon War arc, and there are a number of nice references to that (such as the Son’a being manufacturers of ketracel-white). I personally would have loved to see the Enterprise-E’s participation in the war. Heck, a TNG/DS9 crossover movie set during the war could have been amazing. The main problem with that, of course, would have been its dependency on a long-running, complex storyline from a TV series. Not exactly something easily accessible to Average Joe Moviegoer.

The performances are all solid, with a Donna Murphy and F. Murray Abraham being standouts. I still don’t friggin’ get Anij’s power to freeze time, though. It’s a truly bizarre, pointless, and unexplained literalization of the nice thematic idea that the Ba’ku have found a serene slice of immortal life in which to live, which she discusses with Picard.

Picard’s titular insurrection is made out to be bigger and more important than it really is. TV Picard has defined orders and had crises of conscience beford without popping his pips and taking up arms to stick to his principles. This feels like a contrivance designed to give artificial weight to the story. An attempt to make a fairly standard TNG-type plot feel BIG. It fails. Especially compared to Jim Kirk and crew going rogue in THE SEARCH FOR SPOCK. By comparison, Picard’s rebellion is just lame and forced.


The movie is technically well-made. Jonathan Frakes directed (again), but word has it that he felt the script was weak, and it shows in the final product. The music is great, though, and the (non-ILM) effects are solid for the time, but unremarkable. The production design is also very TNG, but not necesssrily in a good way. We have the villagers in their browns and beiges and brown and beige and browns and beiges. And, oh, look, they’re wearing brown and beige and browns and beiges and beiges and browns. In addition, there’s a lot of brown and beige. Like, a lot.

As noted, this is just a “meh” film. A bloated TV episode. Unoffensive, but forgettable. Good ideas and themes, but without a strong narrative hook or emotional impact. 

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Ted Downum
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 7:34am | IP Logged | 13 post reply

Greg: "...and F. Murray Abraham being standouts."

*****

The guest turns by Abraham and Anthony Zerbe are pretty much all that stuck with me from Insurrection. Abraham in particular really hammed things up enjoyably...or rubbered them up, if you prefer.


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Tony Tower
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 8:02am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

A minor point that annoys me in INSURRECTION is that when the crew insists on joining Picard, all of them are in civilian clothes except Riker and Geordi who are "coincidentally" the two crew members Picard chooses to stay on the Enterprise. For sake of believability, could the film really not (a) have kept everyone else in uniforms until the next scene, (b) repurposed Riker and Geordi's civvies from the series, or (c) sprung for two new outfits? Sticks out like a sore thumb. . .
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 9:47am | IP Logged | 15 post reply

The guest turns by Abraham and Anthony Zerbe are pretty much all that stuck with me from Insurrection.Abraham in particular really hammed things up enjoyably...or rubbered them up, if you prefer.
++++++++

Yeah, Abraham was clearly having fun, and Memory Alpha’s trivia section on the film indicates that he was really invested in the character. 

Unfortunately, Ru’afo comes across as a sort of unmemorable Khan-Lite (bent on revenge, dies after activating a device which will kill a bunch of people, etc.). 

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 9:56am | IP Logged | 16 post reply

A minor point that annoys me in INSURRECTION is that when the crew insists on joining Picard, all of them are in civilian clothes except Riker and Geordi who are "coincidentally" the two crew members Picard chooses to stay on the Enterprise. For sake of believability, could the film really not (a) have kept everyone else in uniforms until the next scene, (b) repurposed Riker and Geordi's civvies from the series, or (c) sprung for two new outfits? Sticks out like a sore thumb. . .
+++++++++

As noted, the titular insurrection really does not feel justified to me. The situation isn’t that far off from many ethical dilemmas seen in TNG, and yet Picard and the others immediately go rogue in civilian clothes, a la THE SEARCH FOR SPOCK. It seems like the sort of thing that Picard could have dealt with within the bounds of his usual job as a starship Captain, especially after Admiral Daugherty is killed and Ru’afo goes off the deep end. 

I think the situation needed to be more extreme for Picard to believably ditch his uniform and sneak down to the planet. It feels very out of character for him to do so with so little provocation. But, then, the movies in general keep trying to turn Picard into a hot-blooded action hero, which totally goes against the nature guy we knew in the TV series. When Kirk went rogue in TSFS, it made a heck of lot more sense, character-wise, although it retroactively tainted the character in that people are now brainwashed into thinking that Kirk was always breaking rules and flaunting authority in TOS, which was simply not the case.


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Tyler Kloster
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 10:24am | IP Logged | 17 post reply

INSURRECTION is, to me, the most boring of all the Trek films...not the worst, but the most boring, which is weird since it came from one of the show's best writers. Aside from the music and the special effects (which are mostly better than the series but somehow a comedown from FIRST CONTACT two years earlier) it really is like watching a 2-part episode of the series, and not one of the better ones.

I believe that at a mere 103 minutes, INSURRECTION is the shortest of all the Trek films, and if you trimmed the lengthy end credits off of that, it would pretty much be exactly the length of a 2-part TNG episode. 

Heck, the opening scene with Data going rogue feels like an episode teaser, and on the rare occasions I watch this one, it always feels like the screen is about to fade to black and the TNG theme sequence will start.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 10:53am | IP Logged | 18 post reply

Agreed on all points, Tyler.
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Bill Collins
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 10:55am | IP Logged | 19 post reply

Is that the one with the cringeworthy Gilbert and
Sullivan opening? I`ve not watched it since release,as
others have said, it`s like an average tv episode.
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 6:30pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Bald young Picard clones, dune buggy jaunts, mentally-challenged Data clones, and TWOK ending ripoffs ahoy!
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 13 April 2018 at 9:32pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply


INSURRECTION has plenty of flaws, but I will watch that one any day of the week over the ridiculous TNG-shitstorm that is NEMESIS (for me, easily the absolute worst of the first 10 TREK films).





Edited by Shaun Barry on 13 April 2018 at 9:33pm
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 12:44am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

STAR TREK NEMESIS (2002).


Oy.

I saw this one in the theater at the time of its release. A very sparsely-populated theater, I might add. I hadn’t seen it again (in its entirety, at least) until now.

This is just a depresssingly damp squib of an ending for THE NEXT GENERATION era and characters. Of course, it wasn’t necessarily intended to be the end, since the tagline was “A Generation’s Final Journey Begins”, and there were tentative plans for a fifth and final TNG film. However, the dismal box office and critical/fan reception put an end to all of that.

The cinematography is quite lovely, and Jerry Goldsmith’s music is great. Some of the action setpieces are quite nice, too. Beyond that, there’s not a whole lot of interest going on, here. There are some good ideas and plot elements, but the whole is pretty unremarkable and weak. As the story goes, director Stuart Baird had never even seen TNG. The script is a mish-mash of incongruous elements (such as the dune buggy chase and Data having yet another “brother”) and rehashes THE WRATH OF KHAN in its climax.

That being said, none of the other nine STAR TREK films had ever dealt with the Romulans in a concrete way, and TNG proper teased us with a potential Federation-Romulan conflict for seven seasons, but never delivered. Well, okay, this film technically doesn’t scratch that itch, either, but at least the Romulans finally get the cinematic spotlight.

Riker and Troi finally get hitched, and Riker finally gets his Captaincy. It’s nice to see Guinan and Wesley Crusher show up at the wedding, too. Wesley’s appearance is problematic, though, since the last time we saw him, he went off...uhh...traveling with the Traveler. The deleted scene where Wesley actual gets to speak reveals that he’s rejoined Starfleet, too, which would have completely undercut his character development from the TV series.

With DS9 having wrapped up by this time, Worf doesn’t need an excuse to be hanging out with the old gang, right? Except that DS9 ended with Worf set to serve as the Federation ambassador to the Klingon Empire. Huh.

The guest parts are well-cast and played. A very young Tom Hardy plays Shinzon, and I’ve read that he went on some kind of drug-fueled, self-destructive bender as a result of the failure of this movie. Yikes. I also didn’t notice that Dina Meyer played the Romulan Commander until I saw her name in the credits. I did, however, know that Ron Perlman played the Reman viceroy, despite his being totally unrecognizable under all that makeup. And (alleged) pedophile Bryan Singer serves as an extra on the Bridge after Troi is blown out into space and uses the Force to fly back into the ship. Or was that scene from a different franchise-killing film? Huh.

As noted, there are moments and ideas which work pretty well, but the whole is very unsatisfying. There’s just a lot of dumb stuff here, ranging from the photo of a bald Picard in his academy days to a clone of Picard also having his accent to the very existence of B4 (aka Derpy Data). And, naturally, if any character is gonna get mind-raped, it’s gonna be poor Deanna Troi. Sigh.

Data’s death had no emotional impact on me in 2002, and it still doesn’t. It should, given my fondness for the character, but it doesn’t. It doesn’t feels properly earned, shocking, or dramatic. It just...happens. Damp squib, no emotion. It also doesn’t help that the SEARCH FOR SPOCK-sequel solve for bringing him back is right there, at the end: B4 contains Data’s memories, which are already starting to surface. Indeed, I believe that IDW’s supposedly canonical COUNTDOWN comic series had Captain Data in command of the Enterprise-E prior to the Nero go back in time and kicking off AbramsTREK. Not that I consider anything involved with AbramsTREK remotely canonical, of course.

I do like the bit where Riker can’t remember the tune Data was trying to whistle, way, way back in the pilot. I do think it would have had more emotional impact if B4 had tried whistling “Pop Goes The Weasel” rather than singing “Blue Skies”. And, wait, Worf knows Irving Berlin, but not Gilbert & Sullivan?

Tom Hardy turns in a strong performance, but Shinzon is just another Khan-Lite. And, in a whopping three out of four TNG films, a solo Picard faces the villain and tries to stop a weapon/device before it can be activated. Not exactly the height of originality, there.

All in all, the TNG films are far, far less successful than the TOS films were in properly capturing the spirit of their parent TV series whilst simultaneously working as satisfying films for a general audience. Ironically, INSURRECTION is the one which comes closest to the spirit of the TV show, but it’s also the most bland and forgettable of the four TNG movies. NEMESIS is just a sad and tired end to a once-mighty film series, and it’s really and truly unfortunate to see these beloved characters go out on such a sour note. 


That being said, I’m not quite done, yet. I still have to listen to John Champion and Ken Ray do their own wrap-up of TNG for the MISSION LOG Podcast, and then write out my own final thought about the show and the films.
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Michael Casselman
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Joined: 14 January 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 940
Posted: 15 April 2018 at 1:12pm | IP Logged | 23 post reply

With all the TV Trek coming out on top of each other, 2 series per week from 1992 until 1999, Trek movies had the problem of not coming across as glorified episodes, and between that and the interconnected continuity that viewers might be looking for in the franchise, it ended up being too much of a good thing all at once, IMO. There was no time allowed for the 'earned beloved stature' that the ten year gap between TOS and TMP could develop... it just chugged along business as usual... 'assembly line Trek' if you will. Absence makes the heart grow fonder.. not that Paramount would have likely embraced that philosophy on something that was still 'selling' as well as it was at the time.
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Richard Stevens
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Joined: 04 May 2004
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 7:40pm | IP Logged | 24 post reply

after Troi is blown out into space and uses the Force to fly back into the ship. Or was that scene from a different franchise-killing film? Huh.

****

I don't recall Troi being blown out into space in Star Trek Into Darkness.
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Greg Kirkman
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Joined: 12 May 2006
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 9:15pm | IP Logged | 25 post reply

True, that particular franchise-killer featured NuKirk and CumberKhan flying through space. 
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