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Topic: Look! Up in the Air! Post Reply | Post New Topic
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116914
Posted: 25 August 2019 at 1:05pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

100 Years
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Phil Frances
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 08 August 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 195
Posted: 25 August 2019 at 1:41pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

Great read, which shows just how quickly technology has advanced in "only" 100 years - and especially in that first decade or so of manned flight ; a quick search on the web for that first Aircraft Transport and Travel poster also found this - 



Look at the much more basic aircraft designs there, just 10 short years earlier. And Englands very first aviation meeting was at Doncaster racecourse, of all places - I only live 25 miles away !

With Branson's Virgin Galactic promising the first commercial spaceflights from next year ( assuming you're wealthy enough to take advantage - and OK with 'space' meaning 'suborbital' for now ), it does make me wonder where we'll be in the next 100 years ...
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116914
Posted: 25 August 2019 at 2:39pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

🎶Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines.....🎶
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Robbie Moubert
Byrne Robotics Member

Evertonian

Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1263
Posted: 25 August 2019 at 4:16pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Some of those old posters are things of beauty.
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Eric Sofer
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 31 January 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3160
Posted: 25 August 2019 at 8:34pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

"They go up diddly up up, they go down diddly down down..."
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Conrad Teves
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 28 January 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 1617
Posted: 26 August 2019 at 7:57am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Nice quote: "Although there were scheduled flights and aviation is developing and growing, it's not massive [...] It's still for the well-off people,"

Contrast to over 100,000 scheduled flights in the world everyday today.

When was the first time an airline lost someone's luggage, I wonder?  
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116914
Posted: 26 August 2019 at 8:22am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

The first time Roger Stern came up to Calgary for a visit the airline lost his luggage--which seemed insane to me, on such a "simple" flight. New York to Calgary. Us to Canada. Barely even an international flight! Not like he was flying from Nairobi or something!

Fortunately, this is an ordeal I have yet to endure.*

___________________

* I take all my baggage as carry-on, which helps!

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Koroush Ghazi
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 25 October 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 1454
Posted: 26 August 2019 at 8:33am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

Having flown Sydney to Los Angeles direct several times, one of the longest flights in the world at around 17.5 hours (the record is 19 hours I believe), I quickly lost my fascination for air travel :)

I vote we invest more money into inventing teleportation!

Edited by Koroush Ghazi on 26 August 2019 at 8:34am
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116914
Posted: 26 August 2019 at 8:45am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

During my teens there was talk of building subterranean tubes that would carry passenger “pods” from any point to any point in ninety minutes. (Curiously, because of the way these things worked, a trip from New York to Boston would take 90 minutes, but so would a trip from New York to Tokyo. Gene Roddenberry appropriated this concept for his TV movie/failed pilot GENESIS II.)
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Eric Sofer
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 31 January 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3160
Posted: 26 August 2019 at 8:58am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Mr. Byrne, there was further fictional use of underground flight in "The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress" by Robert Heinlein. Mind you, this occurred on Luna, so there were contributing factors.

Tangent question - You posted "Look! Up in the Air!" and my mind first called up "Up in the Sky!" (for rather obvious reasons, I would think.) But... what is the difference? How would we tell? Is it simply in the atmosphere above where we can reach? To an ant, my belt buckle may be the sky...
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John Byrne

Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 116914
Posted: 26 August 2019 at 9:08am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

I used “air” so readers would not expect a story about Superman.
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Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member


Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 11926
Posted: 26 August 2019 at 11:11am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Having an airline lose your luggage is a miserable experience. There is a long drawn out process of the numbers dwindling at the baggage carousel before the final, horrible confirmation that you are, indeed, fucked.

I travel with hand luggage as often as possible, but when I go skiing that tends to be a no-goer. I took a flight from Halifax to Denver, via New York, a few years back and that was the first time my bag didn't turn up. It only had my boots and my ski pants (the skis turned up though, just not boots to use with them...). The bag wasn't lost per se. The airline confirmed the bag was still in New York and just didn't make it on to the connecting flight...

I had to hire gear for my first day and then the bag turned up at my hotel the day after. So not a disaster. Just a massive inconvenience.
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